Civil MDC

Guide for the Design and Construction of Structural Concrete Reinforced with Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Bars 2

Guide for the Design and Construction of Structural Concrete Reinforced with Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Bars

Description

Conventional concrete structures are reinforced with non prestressed and prestressed steel. The steel is initially protected against corrosion by the alkalinity of the concrete, usually resulting in durable and serviceable construction. For many structures subjected to aggressive environments, such as marine structures, bridges, and parking garages exposed to deicing salts, combinations of moisture, tempera-ture, and chlorides reduce the alkalinity of the concrete and result in the corrosion of reinforcing steel.

The corrosion process ultimately causes concrete deterioration and loss of serviceability. Composite materials made of fibers embedded in a poly-meric resin, also known as fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP), are an alternative to steel reinforcement for concrete struc-tures.

Fiber-reinforced polymer reinforcing materials are made of continuous aramid fiber (AFRP), carbon fiber (CFRP), or glass fiber (GFRP) embedded in a resin matrix. Examples of FRP reinforcing bars are shown in Fig. 1.1. Because FRP materials are nonmagnetic and noncorro-sive, the problems of electromagnetic interference and steel corrosion can be avoided with FRP reinforcement. Addition-ally, FRP materials exhibit several properties, such as high tensile strength, that make them suitable for use as structural reinforcement.


Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.