Civil MDC

2021 FIBER CONCRETE : in construction by BERNHARD WIETEK 2

2021 FIBER CONCRETE : in construction by BERNHARD WIETEK

Description & Objectives

The ACI Reinforced Concrete Design Handbook provides assistance to professionals engaged in the design of reinforced concrete buildings and related structures. This edition is a major revision that brings it up-to-date with the approach and provisions of “Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete” (ACI 318-19).

The ACI Reinforced Concrete Design Handbook provides dozens of design examples of various reinforced concrete members, such as one- and two-way slabs, beams, columns, walls, diaphragms, footings, and retaining walls. For consistency, many of the numerical examples are based on a fictitious seven-story reinforced concrete building.

Table of contents :
Preface
Acknowledgements
Contents
1 Introduction
1.1 History
1.1.1 Preface from Vitruv – De Architectura 27 B.C.
1.1.2 How long is concrete been used?
1.1.3 How long has fiber-reinforced concrete been used?
1.2 Basic Aspects
1.2.1 Classification of the building material
1.2.2 Fire behavior of the building material
1.2.3 dimensioning of the building material
1.2.4 Requirements for standardization and for the construction industry
1.3 Standards and guidlines
1.3.1 Standarts
1.3.2 Regulations
2 Definitions
2.1 Terms
2.2 Characters
2.3 Units
3 Concrete
3.1 Concrete types
3.2 Concrete classes
3.3 Extended characteristic values
3.4 Cement
3.5 Aggregates (surcharge)
3.6 Water
3.7 Additional concrete
3.7.1 Additives
3.7.2 Concrete admixtures
3.8 Concrete properties
3.8.1 Types of Concrete
3.8.2 Actions on the concrete
3.8.3 Consistency
3.8.4 Abbreviations
3.8.5 Shrinkage
3.8.6 Cement stone
3.9 Environmental compatibility
4 Fibers
4.1 General information
4.2 Plastic fibers
4.2.1 Mikrofibers
4.2.2 Makrofibers
4.3 Steel fibers
4.3.1 Hook shape
4.3.2 Waveform
4.3.3 Compressed form
4.4 Glass fibers
4.4.1 Alkali-resistant fibers
4.4.1.1 Integral glass fibers
4.4.1.2 Water dispersible glass fibers
4.4.2 Non-alkali-resistant fibers
4.5 Natural fibers
4.5.1 Plant fibers
4.5.2 Animal fibers
5 FC processing
5.1 Types of concrete to be used
5.2 Additives for pumped concrete
5.3 Common dosages
5.4 Addition of fibers
5.5 Hedgehog formation
5.6 Installation of fiber-reinforced concrete
5.6.1 In building construction and civil engineering
5.6.2 For fiber-reinforced shotcrete
5.7 Different fiber materials
5.7.1 Plastic fiber concrete
5.7.1.1 Constructive applications
5.7.1.2 Statically effective applications
5.7.1.3 Thermally effective applications
5.7.1.4 Effects of interest from a building biology point of view
5.7.2 Steel fiber concrete
5.7.2.1 Constructive applications
5.7.2.2 Statically effective applications
5.7.3 Glass fiber concrete
5.7.3.1 Constructive applications
5.7.3.2 Statically effective applications
5.7.4 Carbon fiber concrete
5.7.4.1 Constructive applications
5.7.4.2 Statically effective applications
6 Properties
6.1 Concrete properties
6.2 Fiber properties
6.2.1 Plastic fibers
6.2.1.1 Microfibers
6.2.1.2 Macrofibers
6.2.2 Steel fibers
6.2.3 Glass fibers
6.3 Setting process
6.4 Fibers to prevent shrinkage cracks
6.4.1 Mix calculation for concrete
6.4.2 Determination of the grain surface
6.4.3 Determination of the fiber surface
6.4.4 Avoidance of shrinkage cracks
6.5 Composite effect of fibers
6.5.1 Material characteristics of the fibers
6.5.2 Geometry of the fibers
6.5.3 Geometry factor
6.5.4 Dosage
6.5.5 Spatial distribution of the fibers in the concrete
6.5.6 Shape angle for power transmission
6.5.7 Friction factors of the fibers
6.5.8 Determining the fiber tension
6.5.8.1 From the concrete strain
6.5.8.2 From the fiber characteristics
6.6 Material testing experiments
6.6.1 Experimental arrangement
6.6.1.1 Simple bending beam
6.6.1.2 Simple bending beam with notch
6.6.1.3 Standard bending beam
6.6.2 Experimental procedure
6.6.3 Evaluation of the measured data
7 FC dimensioning
7.1 Dimensioning procedure
7.1.1 Service load method
7.1.2 Load method
7.1.3 Design with partial safety factors
7.2 Reliability concepts
7.2.1 Deterministic reliability principle
7.2.2 Probabilistic reliability principle
7.2.3 Semiprobabilistic reliability principle
7.2.4 Verification of structural safety
7.2.5 Verification of suitability for use
7.3 Dimensioning theorie
7.3.1 Dimensioning for material selection dosage
7.3.1.1 Bending
7.3.1.1.1 Condition 1 (not cracked):
7.3.1.1.2 Condition 1-2 (partly cracked)
7.3.1.1.3 Condition 2 (maximum cracked)
7.3.1.2 Bending with longitudinal force
7.3.1.2.1 Small eccentricity
7.3.1.2.2 Mean eccentricity
7.3.1.2.3 Large eccentricity
7.3.1.3 Compression struts
7.3.1.4 shear check
7.3.1.5 Breakout of a support
7.3.2 Dimensioning for cross-section selection Dimensioning
7.3.2.1 Bending
7.3.2.2 Bending with longitudinal force
7.3.2.2.1 Small eccentricity
7.3.2.2.2 Mean eccentricity
7.3.2.3 Compression struts
7.3.2.4 shear check
7.3.2.5 Breakout of a support
7.4 Dimensioning samples
7.4.1 Cross-section in bending
7.4.1.1 Plastic fiber
7.4.1.2 Steel fiber
7.4.1.3 Glass fiber
7.4.2 Cross-section in bending with normal force
7.4.2.1 Plastic fiber
7.4.2.2 Steel fiber
7.4.3 Cross-section in compression (buckling)
7.4.3.1 Plastic fiber
7.4.3.2 Steel fiber
7.4.4 Cross section on shear force
7.4.4.1 Plastic fiber
7.4.4.2 Steel fiber
7.4.5 Application with shotcrete
7.4.5.1 Plastic fiber
7.4.5.2 Steel fiber
7.4.6 Application with inverted T-beam
7.4.7 Design for a bridge
7.4.8 Design for a harbor wall without anchor
7.4.9 Comparison of design with different fibers
7.4.9.1 Comparison with different fibers
7.4.9.2 Comparison with shrink fiber and different fibers
8 Applications
8.1 Base plates
8.1.1 Residential buildings
8.1.2 Industrial floors
8.2 Walls
8.2.1 Basement walls
8.2.2 Wall scopes
8.3 Ceilings
8.3.1 Residential buildings
8.3.2 Industrial buildings
8.4 Beams
8.4.1 Undercoats and overcoats
8.4.2 Single beam
8.4.3 Roadways
8.5 Galleries
8.5.1 Footpaths and cycle paths
8.5.2 Roads
8.6 Tunnel lining
8.6.1 support measures
8.6.2 Inner lining
8.7 Tubbings
8.7.1 Tunnel construction
8.7.2 Shaft sinking
8.8 Prefabricated parts
8.8.1 Pipes
8.8.2 Slabs and ceilings
8.8.3 Stairs
8.8.4 Retaining walls
8.9 Construction pit and slope stabilisation
8.9.1 Construction pits
8.9.2 Slope protection
8.9.3 Wall protection
8.10 Videos of construction sites
Appendix
List of Tables
List of Figures
Bibliography
Index

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